Has Blackbaud changed course to better serve nonprofits? An interview with Blackbaud CEO Mike Gianoni

 In Constituent Relationship Management (CRM), CRM Technology

We know a lot about Blackbaud. Two of Build’s partners worked there. Our firm has worked with hundreds of nonprofits, the majority using at least one Blackbaud product.

Blackbaud is changing rapidly (along with the overall nonprofit software industry) and we are eager to stay on top of those changes.

Build Consulting recently sat down for a chat with Blackbaud CEO Mike Gianoni. We learned a lot about both the company’s past, present and future. We are thankful to Mike for his willingness to speak with us to share his perspective and provide greater context for some of the emerging changes at the company.

Our Three-Part Series

Part 1: Losing its way: What Blackbaud CEO Mike Gianoni found when he came to the company – and what he is trying to do about it

Part 2: Reducing complexity: Mike Gianoni is streamlining Blackbaud’s software portfolio

Part 3: Blackbaud SKY: Mike Gianoni wants to revolutionize how nonprofit software looks and acts

Overall, What Did We Learn?

  • Our instincts about Blackbaud lacking momentum in innovation and direction were correct.
  • When Mike started in the CEO role, he quickly came to understand these problems and made changes to move the company in a positive direction.
  • Those changes will provide new (much needed) value to customers and help improve Blackbaud’s reputation.

But be sure to read all three parts of the series, not just this summary. Each part has its own importance to your understanding of this important vendor and its position within the market!

While we pride ourselves on our independence, we maintain good relationships with many technology companies (including Blackbaud) that serve nonprofit organizations. Most importantly, we want to understand how changes in the nonprofit technology market are going to affect our clients and the broader nonprofit community. 

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